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Monthly Archives: November 2013

Military deployments tied to teens’ depression

By Kathleen Raven

NEW YORK (Reuters Health) – Adolescents who experience the deployment of a family member in the U.S. military may face an increased risk of depression, suggests a new study.

Ninth- and eleventh-grade students in California public schools with two or more deployment experiences over the past decade were 56 percent more likely to feel sad or hopeless compared with their non-military-family peers, the researchers found.

The same kids were 34 percent more likely to have suicidal thoughts.

The study is one of very few that compare students from military families to their non-military peers, said Julie Cederbaum, an assistant professor of social work at the University of Southern California in Los Angeles, who led the study.

“One of the goals of our research was to highlight kids’ experiences, which have been unintentionally ignored in the past,” Cederbaum told Reuters Health.

Past research in this area has mostly been conducted in clinical settings or at summer camps designed specifically for military families, Cederbaum and her colleagues write in the Journal of Adolescent Health.

Less than one percent of the U.S. population has been on active duty at any point in time since the attacks of September 11, 2001, according to the Pew Research Center in Washington, D.C.

Kids in military families may feel isolated with so few peers who can share and understand their experiences, Cederbaum’s team points out in their report.

For their study, the researchers tacked on an extra questionnaire to a statewide survey administered every two […]

By |November 30th, 2013|blogs|0 Comments

Military deployments tied to teens’ depression

By Kathleen Raven

NEW YORK (Reuters Health) – Adolescents who experience the deployment of a family member in the U.S. military may face an increased risk of depression, suggests a new study.

Ninth- and eleventh-grade students in California public schools with two or more deployment experiences over the past decade were 56 percent more likely to feel sad or hopeless compared with their non-military-family peers, the researchers found.

The same kids were 34 percent more likely to have suicidal thoughts.

The study is one of very few that compare students from military families to their non-military peers, said Julie Cederbaum, an assistant professor of social work at the University of Southern California in Los Angeles, who led the study.

“One of the goals of our research was to highlight kids’ experiences, which have been unintentionally ignored in the past,” Cederbaum told Reuters Health.

Past research in this area has mostly been conducted in clinical settings or at summer camps designed specifically for military families, Cederbaum and her colleagues write in the Journal of Adolescent Health.

Less than one percent of the U.S. population has been on active duty at any point in time since the attacks of September 11, 2001, according to the Pew Research Center in Washington, D.C.

Kids in military families may feel isolated with so few peers who can share and understand their experiences, Cederbaum’s team points out in their report.

For their study, the researchers tacked on an extra questionnaire to a statewide survey administered every two […]

By |November 30th, 2013|blogs|0 Comments

Military deployments tied to teens’ depression

By Kathleen Raven

NEW YORK (Reuters Health) – Adolescents who experience the deployment of a family member in the U.S. military may face an increased risk of depression, suggests a new study.

Ninth- and eleventh-grade students in California public schools with two or more deployment experiences over the past decade were 56 percent more likely to feel sad or hopeless compared with their non-military-family peers, the researchers found.

The same kids were 34 percent more likely to have suicidal thoughts.

The study is one of very few that compare students from military families to their non-military peers, said Julie Cederbaum, an assistant professor of social work at the University of Southern California in Los Angeles, who led the study.

“One of the goals of our research was to highlight kids’ experiences, which have been unintentionally ignored in the past,” Cederbaum told Reuters Health.

Past research in this area has mostly been conducted in clinical settings or at summer camps designed specifically for military families, Cederbaum and her colleagues write in the Journal of Adolescent Health.

Less than one percent of the U.S. population has been on active duty at any point in time since the attacks of September 11, 2001, according to the Pew Research Center in Washington, D.C.

Kids in military families may feel isolated with so few peers who can share and understand their experiences, Cederbaum’s team points out in their report.

For their study, the researchers tacked on an extra questionnaire to a statewide survey administered every two […]

By |November 29th, 2013|blogs|0 Comments

Angola says Dos Santos is fine, denies cancer treatment report

LUANDA (Reuters) – Angola on Friday denied a report by Portuguese state TV that President Jose Eduardo dos Santos was undergoing cancer treatment, saying the long-serving 71-year-old was in good health.

The RTP report on Thursday said Dos Santos had checked in to the oncology unit of a clinic in Barcelona. The broadcaster later said on its website he was about to undergo surgery. Neither report cited any sources.

“The president is in Spain, but was not and is not interned in any hospital,” the presidency said in a statement. “He is in good health and will return within days.”

In power since 1979, Dos Santos is Africa’s second longest-serving leader. He was elected for a new five-year term in August 2012, and has long kept observers guessing about who might succeed him.

More recently speculation has focused on the state of his health.

He flew to Barcelona from Luanda on November 9 on a private visit. Earlier this year he spent 56 days on a private visit abroad, which Angolan news agency ANGOP said was to Spain, although it was not clear if he spent the whole trip there.

Dos Santos led his MPLA party to victory in a 27-year civil war against rebel group UNITA in 2002 and has since trounced his former war enemy in two elections.

While he presents himself as the guarantor of stability and rapid economic growth since the end of the war, opponents and rights groups have long accused him of doing too little […]

By |November 29th, 2013|blogs|0 Comments

Angola denies report that Dos Santos treated for cancer in Spain

LUANDA (Reuters) – Angola on Friday denied a report by Portuguese state TV that the oil-producing African state’s long-serving President Jose Eduardo dos Santos was undergoing cancer treatment in Spain.

“I don’t have anything to say, because it is not true,” Angolan Foreign Minister Georges Chikoti told reporters in Luanda.

The RTP report, broadcast late on Thursday, said dos Santos had checked in to the oncology unit of a clinic in Barcelona. A follow-up report on its website said he was about to undergo surgery.

Neither report cited any sources.

The 71-year-old dos Santos has been in power in Africa’s second-biggest oil producer since 1979, making him the continent’s second longest-serving leader.

He was elected for a new five-year term in August 2012, but has long kept observers guessing about his political plans and who might succeed him.

Dos Santos travelled to Barcelona from Luanda on November 9 on a private visit. Earlier this year, he spent 56 days on a private visit abroad, and the Angolan news agency ANGOP said then he was in Spain, although it was no clear if he spent all of his trip there.

(Reporting by Shrikesh Laxmidas; Editing by Ed Cropley and Pascal Fletcher)

By |November 29th, 2013|blogs|0 Comments